Board Games and Boxes

I’ve played a lot of board games. I have noted that on this blog plenty of times.

A couple of nights ago my friends and I played a new board game. At the end of it we packaged up the game, as all board games do.

This time though we made note of how easy it was to pack up the box… Comparatively.

And we got to thinking about good and bad box designs, and how could we objectively (subjectively as best as possible) score these boxes.

We talked about straight box design. This led to games like Betrayal at House on the Hill scoring very low, which is one that I expected.

Betrayal is a game that has dozens upon dozens of tokens and only provides a simple box with no bags, this is bad box design.

Then we talked about Chutes and Ladders, and one of my friends brought up the point that the box isn’t great. It is pretty much just a 1 chamber cardboard box with no bags.

Another one of my friends brought up that the Chutes and Ladders box is perfect, for the complexity of the game the box is very suitable.

And then I realized that you can think of box design and quality as a ratio of box design over game complexity.

This means a game like chutes and ladders has a game complexity of 1 (out of 10) and the box, being a simple cardboard box has a score of 1. The ratio becomes 1:1 or 10 out of 10.

For a game like betrayal the game complexity is pretty much a 10/10 for tokens and pieces. For the box quality it is about a 2/10. The ratio then becomes 2/10 which is really low.

I really like this scale and I like trying to get a rating for every new board game I play. Every new board game that I review on here I’ll add my rating.

Have a great week!

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